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Qualcomm just announced its Snapdragon 835 chipset, built on Samsung’s 10 nm FinFET process, which promises a boost in power and energy efficiency, but it looks like that’s not the only thing the company will bring. Today, Qualcomm launched its vulnerability rewards program which invites white hat hackers to improve the security of its Snapdragon family of processors, and the company is offering up to $15,000 for those who find critical bugs or flaws in its products.

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Qualcomm’s new bug bounty program is pretty self-explanatory: with a focus on its Snapdragon processors – especially the recently-launched Snapdragon 835 – the company wants those technologically savvy individuals out there to find critical bugs and flaws in its products that might have been overlooked by the company. Not only will you get a chance to win up to $15,000 as a reward, but Qualcomm will honor your contribution with recognition in either the QTI Product Security or the CodeAuroraForum Hall of Fame, “depending on the nature of the submission.”

Not only will you get a chance to win up to $15,000 as a reward, but Qualcomm will honor your contribution with recognition in either the QTI Product Security or the CodeAuroraForum Hall of Fame, “depending on the nature of the submission.”

As Alex Gantman – vice president of engineering at Qualcomm Technologies – explains, security is of utmost importance to the company, and the new vulnerability rewards program will be an effective incentive for the community:

We have always been proud of our collaborative relationship with the security research community. Over the years, researchers have helped us improve the security of our products by reporting vulnerabilities directly to us. Although the vast majority of security improvements in our products come from our internal efforts, a vulnerability rewards program represents a meaningful part of our broader security efforts.

The program is effective immediately, and you can find more details regarding which chipsets are in scope and what kind of software vulnerability categories the company is looking for by visiting Hacker One’s website.

If you’re an expert in this area, you might want to give this a try. While the lowest security rating will get you $1,000, the highest prize is, indeed, $15,000.

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