Smartwatches

Smartwatches

Android Wear 2.0 and new LG watches now expected earlier

Evan Blass has just updated the arrival date for both Android Wear 2.0 and the two Google watches built by LG on which it will be showcased. Previously, Blass claimed the dual launch would occur on February 9, but that date has now apparently been brought forward by a day to February 8 instead. That’s this Wednesday, people.

Just when we were all starting to get over our boredom with Android Wear watches, we’ll now have two all new options for adorning our wrists and some more compelling reasons to use them. With any luck we might even find that the delay in releasing Wear 2.0 was to make it perfectly stable. At the very least, we’ll be getting a new Android watch with which to use Android Pay.

According to Android Police, the LG Watch Style will cost $249 and the larger, LTE/NFC/GPS-equipped LG Watch Sport will be priced at $349. Blass hasn’t mentioned if the February 10 sale date has also been brought forward by a day. Stay tuned for more news on Android Wear 2.0 and the two new wearable offerings this week.

So this is the LG Watch Style

LG is making two Android Wear smartwatches for Google to launch alongside Android Wear 2.0 in the very near future. A new leak from Evan Blass reveals one of them, the LG Watch Style, in two of three color options. The LG Watch Sport, the larger wearable LG is making, has not yet been pictured in such detail, although some low-res renders were doing the rounds recently.

Blass didn’t reveal anything much about the devices, other than the colors: silver and rose gold. But the rumor mill puts a 1.2-inch P-OLED display with 360 x 360 pixel resolution, 4 GB of storage, 512 MB of RAM, IP 67 rating and a 240 mAh battery in the more stylish version of the Google watch.

The LG Watch Sport variant is rumored to have more RAM (736 MB), a larger battery (430 mAh), larger screen (1.38 inches at 480 x 480 resolution), IP 68 rating, GPS, NFC and LTE connectivity. Huawei’s rumored Watch 2 is also expected to deliver LTE at MWC 2017 next month.

LG, working with Google, however, may reveal these two new smartwatches ahead of MWC on February 9 according to Blass.

Interestingly though, considering the Nexus-like production of these wearables, there is no visible Google branding in the renders. Make of that what you will. Remember, LG was one of Google’s original Wear partners, producing the original LG G Watch under similarly tight constraints.

There’s now a LTE version of the Samsung Gear S3 Classic

Samsung has officially launched a LTE-equipped version of the Gear S3 Classic. Until now, the only LTE-enabled option for Gear S3 fans was the more rugged-looking Frontier edition. For now, the smartwatch is available exclusively through South Korea’s SK Telecom. The carrier is selling it for 451,000 won, which is around $390.

SK Telecom has also developed three watch faces in partnership with Samsung that bring the look and feel of a traditional watch to the Gear S3 Classic LTE. They come with a ticking sound as well as a night light mode. These three watch faces are exclusive to the newly announced smartwatch and can be downloaded via the Galaxy Apps Store.

See also:

HTC’s “Halfbeak” smartwatch appears again in new photos

4 days ago

As of now, there’s no word if the Gear S3 Classic LTE will remain exclusive to SK Telecom and South Korea or if it will eventually come to other markets as well. Hopefully, Samsung will release a statement regarding the subject soon.

In the meantime, SK Telecom is also offering what it calls the “Gear Happiness Compensation Program” that can provide a discount of up to 50,000 won — around $43 — to those who buy the new Gear S3 Classic LTE smartwatch while returning a different Gear S device. The offer ends on March 31.

Smartwatches haven’t really taken off yet, but they do have their share of fans around the world. The are quite a few of them to choose from, but the Samsung Gear S3 is definitely one of the best, mainly because of its rotating bezel that really makes the device easy to use. With Android Wear 2.0 right around the corner, we’re expecting two new Google smartwatches made in collaboration with LG.

HTC’s “Halfbeak” smartwatch appears again in new photos

The HTC smartwatch codenamed “Halfbeak” has broken cover once again. The device has been rumored forever and finally materialized in October last year, when we were treated to the first leaked images of the HTC wearable. Now, a new suite of images has cropped up on Weibo that seem to indicate there’s more to the story than a forgotten prototype.

See also:

Best Android Wear watches

2 weeks ago

The images show the same design we saw previously, with two dedicated buttons on the right, a circular watch face with no flat tire and a rubber strap with Under Armor co-branding on the back, next to some pogo pins and a heart-rate sensor. Like the previously leaked photos, this unit is running a version of Android Wear and Google Play Services from mid-2015. You can view a bunch more photos on Weibo.

HTC’s “Halfbeak” smartwatch appears again in new photos

Assuming the photos are legit, we might finally see the HTC One Watch, or whatever it will be called, unveiled at MWC 2017 next month. As you know, Android Wear 2.0 is due out in early February – a couple of weeks ahead of MWC – so the timing makes sense, even if it is a little weird not to see a pre-release build on the pictured device.

There’s no guarantee that this watch is going to be announced in Barcelona next month, but HTC is due another Under Armor collaboration and if the device hasn’t already been scrapped, then the arrival of Android Wear 2.0 is as good a time as any to finally release it.

Would you like to see a HTC smartwatch? Or is Halfbeak better left on the shelf?

State of wearables: Where is this product category headed?

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In many ways, this year has been the Year of Google. First, Google challenged Apple’s lead in the premium smartphone market by axing the popular Nexus line and replacing it with the critically-acclaimed, high-priced Pixel and Pixel XL. With the advent of the Pixel phones, we finally got to experience Google’s Daydream platform, which is essentially the future of VR for Android devices.

But we’ve seen a lot of other impressive tech, too. Let’s not forget the impressive “budget flagship” we had in the OnePlus 3 and 3T, dual-camera advancements from LG and Huawei, the Samsung’s Note 7 would’ve likely been the most acclaimed device of the year, were it not for its unfortunate tendency to spontaneously combust, and the Galaxy S7 line has been the most well-received Samsung phones in recent memory.

If you haven’t noticed, basically all of the year’s best gadgetry are smartphones with perhaps the most notable admission being wearables. Why is it that wearables seem all but forgotten in 2016? And what does that say about the future of wearables? Is the future for smartwatches, fitness trackers, and other wearable tech as grim as it seems?

Where did wearable tech get its start?

Although wearable tech seems relatively new, this category of tech has been trying to sputter to life for at least a few decades. The digital watch — which is passé today — first emerged in 1972 and could be considered the first step toward what would eventually become the Apple Watch and Android Wear devices. However, after some brief popularity, most of the wristwatch-wearing crowd returned to the more classic and refined analog watches of yesteryear. Then, in 1984, the Seiko RC-1000 Wrist Terminal (yes, that was its actual name) was the first wristwatch to interface with a computer and was, itself, powered by a computer chip. Nineteen years later, Fossil released its Wrist PDA, which was essentially a PalmOS PDA on the wrist. But none of these earlier devices were anything more than a novelty and a bleak reminder of the technological limitations of the time.

Arguably the first notable smart wearable device — which is largely credited with igniting the wearable tech revolution — was the Pebble. It launched as a Kickstarter campaign in April 2013, featuring a monochrome display and, importantly, its own Pebble OS operating system that was compatible with both Android and iOS devices. After the end of its Kickstarter campaign, the Pebble was launched at Best Buy where it quickly sold out in five days. This prompted the popular OEMs — Apple, Google, LG, Microsoft, Sony, and numerous others — to develop their own wearables, but Samsung was first with the Galaxy Gear, which was based on Android 4.2, though the line later moved over to Samsung’s own Tizen OS. Since then, most consumer tech manufacturers have released some type of wearable device, including LG’s G Watch series, the Huawei Watch, Samsung’s Tizen-powered Gear S series, Sony’s SmartWatch series, the Apple Watch, and the Moto 360 series, among others.

State of wearables: Where is this product category headed?

Pebble’s successful Kickstarter should be credited with sparking the latest wearable tech revolution.

It was important for us to take a look back at the (relatively brief) history of wearable tech because it sets the tone for much of the rest of this discussion. First, we should note that the first smartwatches weren’t created to fulfill a need that wasn’t already being met. As it stands, the smartwatch’s niche is mostly fulfilled by the smartphone that both predates it and is much more effective at fulfilling most communication needs. The potential convenience of receiving notifications without interacting with a smartphone is overshadowed by the fact that we must still defer to our smartphones for anything but the most basic of interactions with these notifications. Therefore, interacting with the smartwatch is often an unnecessary or superfluous step between receiving the notification and responding to it.

Of course, it’s worth noting that the smartwatch isn’t the only form of wearable tech; Bluetooth headsets (the kind for hands-free calling), virtual reality headsets, fitness trackers, and sports watches are also considered wearable tech. The reason why we tend to think of smartwatches as the epitome of wearable tech is because smartwatches are the wearable that has the most versatility and the widest appeal.

Let’s look at the numbers

As stated previously, Pebble was the first smartwatch to launch, selling approximately 400,000 units in its debut year. In 2014, Pebble sales increased to about 700,000 units before becoming quite stunted. In fact, the company returned to Kickstarter earlier this year to raise funding for the Pebble 2, Pebble Time 2, Pebble Time Round, and a new product called the Pebble Core, which combined a wearable device with Amazon Alexa support. The campaign was successful in that it was funded and most of these new Pebble products are now available in traditional retail locations; however, the Pebble Core is yet to see a commercial release and the future for that is pretty bleak considered the recent Pebble sale. 

Although Pebble may have been the first big name in wearables, Samsung quickly claimed the majority of the wearables market, almost doubling Pebbles sales in 2014 at 1.2 million Gear units. Part of the reason for Samsung’s early success was its shotgun approach to wearables; rather than making a single wearable, Samsung released several different wearables with multiple operating systems at once. With the release of its first Android Wear smartwatch, Samsung had six models of smart- and fitness watches on the market: the Samsung Gear (Tizen OS), Gear Live (Android Wear), Gear Fit (Tizen OS), Gear 2 (Tizen OS), Gear 2 Neo (Tizen OS), and the Gear S (Tizen OS).

Apple has seen a dramatic drop in Apple Watch sales, having sold 1.1 million units during Q3 this year compared to just under 4 million last year.

While Samsung might have dominated wearables in those early days, the honor of ‘First Android Wear Device’ actually goes to the LG G Watch, but its lead was slim. Around the same time, both the Samsung Gear Live and Moto 360 launched with the latter device’s round design being especially popular. From summer 2014 to the end of the year, about 700,000 Android Wear devices were sold.

See also:

The best Android Wear watches

2 weeks ago

But the game-changer was the highly-anticipated Apple Watch, which officially launched in April 2015 and garnered $1 billion in revenue in a matter of weeks. Like most other Apple products, the initial response to Apple’s debut in the wearable market was overwhelming. Before the Apple Watch, the average cost of a smartwatch was just $189; however, shortly after the launch of the Apple Watch, the average smartwatch cost jumped by more than half to $290. Unfortunately, Apple has been shy when it comes to their specific sales numbers, but analysts estimate that 12 million Apple Watch units shipped over the eight months it was available in 2015. Clearly, there was a demand for high-end smartwatches, right? Well, this year’s numbers are a bit more telling about the current state of wearable technology.

Comparing third-quarter sales this year to third-quarter sales last year, wearable tech sales have dropped by 52 percent overall, according to CNN. To be clear, this figure is accounting for all smartwatches made by all OEMs and running all operating systems. Even Apple — who quickly dominated the smartwatch market and recently released a second generation Apple Watch — has seen a dramatic drop in Apple Watch sales, having sold 1.1 million units during third quarter this year compared to just under 4 million units during the same period last year; this amounts to a decrease of 72 percent while still making up 70 percent of smartwatch sales overall.

Too much and not enough

If you consider the shrinking market share that wearables currently have in consumer tech overall, it’s not surprising that a number of OEMs have chosen not to develop new models of wearables in the upcoming year. For instance, Motorola — behind arguably the most successful Android Wear device we’ve seen thus far — announced there’d be no new Moto smartwatch coming in 2017. Similarly, Google pushed back Android 2.0 for launch sometime in 2017 after originally scheduling its release this past fall.

There’s the issue of wearable devices attempting to fill a niche that was already mostly occupied by the smartphone itself

When you step back and consider the entire picture, a couple points become quite obvious. First, there’s the issue of wearable devices attempting to fill a niche that was already mostly occupied by the smartphone itself. As far back as the advent of the digital watchface in the 1970s, it seems that the intermittent success of wearable tech could mostly be attributed to the novelty factor rather than to its utility. The fact remains that wearable tech represents a pretty substantial investment while being essentially an extension of your smartphone’s notifications. For the most part, you must still own and carry a smartphone to use wearable tech. Even on wearable devices that can make and receive calls and function completely independent of a smartphone, the experience of using a smartwatch for things like web browsing, sending and receiving messages, media consumption, and numerous other tasks pales in comparison to using a smartphone, which was already designed to make these computer-level functions ulta-portable.

Another issue is the cost of adopting wearable technology. Over time, we expect any new technology to decline in price and become more affordable, but any decline in cost will likely be offset by limitations in utility. A device’s high price can be more easily justified when there’s the novelty of being an early-adopter; however, there ultimately comes a point when we want to see some sort of payoff, but wearable tech doesn’t have enough to offer us right now to justify the cost of adoption and the conscious effort it takes to accommodate wearable tech in one’s daily life. Thus, it seems that wearables are currently little more than a passing attraction.

State of wearables: Where is this product category headed?

The lack of new smartwatches from Motorola and other manufacturers suggests that new technology is needed to make smartwatches a success.

Is wearable tech in our future?

It’s difficult to say what the future of wearable tech will be, but we’ve surely not seen the end of the wearable revolution. After all, the traditional, non-smart analog wristwatch is still a staple accessory for many people, so the wrist still has untapped potential when it comes to consumer technology.

Today, we see two different types of wearable tech: Devices centered on function and devices that offer an experience. Fitness trackers and health-related wearables offer something that smartphones mostly can’t do, so this class of wearables will likely remain. On the other hand, smartwatches like the Moto 360 and Huawei Watch are a novelty and luxury item; they don’t currently offer anything that can’t be done (and better enjoyed) on the larger display and with the better performance of a smartphone. Instead, smartwatches are a high-cost extension of a very limited number of smartphone features that can be made more accessible on the wrist.

A number of non-tech brands like Armani and Kate Spade are getting into the wearable market with hybrid devices. Typically a hybrid will look like a standard analog wristwatch, but it still has Bluetooth connectivity, fitness tracking capabilities, and a number of other smart features. Since they don’t have to power digital displays and processors, they have outstanding battery life, making them very low-maintenance. The lack of display means that hybrids aren’t meant to be an extension of your phone’s notifications; instead, hybrid smartwatches are much more focused. It’s possible this more practical and easier-to-adopt wearable will be seen much more often as we move forward. On the other hand, there may be other clues to indicate a more optimistic future for wearable tech.

When Google announced the new Pixel phones, the company also announced Daydream, the virtual reality platform that would be baked into Android. Currently, the number of devices compatible with Daydream is limited, but Daydream compatibility will surely be a mainstay of Android devices moving forward. As VR gains a stronger following and Daydream grows as a platform, we could see smartwatches and other wearables incorporated into the VR and AR experience. For example, rather than using a controller, users could interact with the virtual environments with their own hands if their smartwatches became spatial sensors. Similarly, wearable devices could be implemented into augmented reality so that wearing a smartwatch would allow a Tango-enabled device to more effectively track a user’s movement through the mapped space. In short, both Daydream and Tango could tap into wearable tech to make virtual and augmented realities all the more immersive.

Cloud computing will prove to be vital to the future growth of the wearable market. Although they’re limited by size constraints, wearables can leverage the cloud for more power and capabilities while also being more cost effective, too. As well, the evolution of data speeds — particularly the transition from 4G to 5G speeds — would contribute to major improvements in the usability of wearable tech.

In summary, we’ve surely not seen the last of the smartwatch, but we should probably expect some major changes to the wearable market in the near future. But now I want to hear from you. What do you think about wearable technology? Are you an early adopter of the smartwatch? If you’ve not jumped on the wearable tech bandwagon, what held you back? Leave your thoughts in the comment section below.

Best Android Wear watches (December 2016)

Android Wear has evolved a lot since it was first announced back in 2014. In the early days, there were only a few options, mainly from Motorola and LG. These days, many handset makers have thrown their weight into Android Wear, and even traditional watchmakers have begun to embrace the Google-powered smartwatch platform.

With the number of watches available increasing dramatically, it’s hard to keep track of which watches stand out as the best. For one thing, most of the watches are all quite similar in software and hardware, leaving design preferences as the biggest factor. In order to help you make the most informed decision on which watch is right for you, we’ve rounded up what we feel to be the best Android Wear smartwatches you can buy right now.

Editor’s note: We’ll be updating this list regularly as new devices launch.
Update, December 2016: This month we removed the ASUS ZenWatch 2, TAG Heuer Connected and LG Watch Urbane to make room for the ZenWatch 3 and Polar M600.

Best overall

Motorola Moto 360 (2nd Generation)

The original Moto 360 was one of the best Android Wear watches around for quite some time, and now its successor is also at the top of the list.

The Motorola Moto 360 (2nd Gen.) has a bigger battery than its predecessor, a Snapdragon 400 processor and comes in two different sizes to fit more users’ wrists. You’ll even be able to customize it with Moto Maker. Overall, the biggest advantages the new Moto 360 brings to the table are the refreshed processing package, a customizable design and the addition of lugs that will make it much easier to swap out watch bands.

Specs

42mm variant:

  • 1.37-inch IPS LCD display with 360 x 325 resolution, 233ppi
  • 1.2GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 processor
  • 512MB of RAM
  • 4GB of on-board storage
  • 300mAh battery
  • 42.0 x 42.0 x 11.4mm
  • IP67 dust and water resistance

46mm variant:

  • 1.56-inch IPS LCD display with 360 x 330 resolution, 263ppi
  • 1.2GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 processor
  • 512MB of RAM
  • 4GB of on-board storage
  • 400mAh battery
  • 46.0 x 46.0 x 11.4mm
  • IP67 dust and water resistance

Read more

Buy now from Amazon
Buy now from Motorola

Runner up

Huawei Watch

The Huawei Watch was first unveiled towards the beginning of 2015 at MWC, though it didn’t actually make its way to retail until the tail-end of the summer. Offering a design that is much more “watch-like” then many of its competitors, the Huawei Watch is certainly one of the more attractive Android Wear watches on the market and benefits from easily replaceable watch straps and a long-lasting battery.

For those that aren’t a fan of the flat-tire look we’ve seen with Motorola’s circular watches, you’ll be happy to know that this isn’t the case here. As for the rest of the specs? Everything is pretty standard fare, as most of the newer Android Wear watches feature roughly the same internals. That said, the AMOLED display on the Huawei Watch is one of the best displays available in the Android Wear market right now.

Specs

  • 1.4-inch AMOLED display with 400 x 400 resolution, 286ppi
  • 1.2GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 processor
  • 512MB of RAM
  • 4GB of on-board storage
  • 300mAh battery
  • 42.0 x 42.0 x 11.3mm
  • IP67 dust and water resistance

Read more

Buy now from Amazon

Honorable mention

ASUS ZenWatch 3

ASUS’ new ZenWatch 3 is one of the most beautifully designed Android Wear devices on the market.

It really is difficult not to fall in love with its great design, sharp display, excellent performance and solid hardware. It does feature proprietary lugs, though, which means you’ll have to buy replacement straps through ASUS if you’d like to change up the look of the device.

All in all, this may be the most well-rounded watch we’ve ever reviewed. If you’d like to pick one up for yourself, it’s available now for just $229.

Specs

  • 1.39-inch AMOLED display with 400 x 400 resolution, 287ppi
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 2100 processor
  • 512MB of RAM
  • 4GB of on-board storage
  • 341mAh battery
  • 45 x 45 x 9.95 – 10.75mm
  • IP67 dust and water resistance

Read more

Buy now from Best Buy

Best for fitness

Polar M600

Polar’s new M600 sport watch is by far the best Android Wear-powered fitness tracker on the market.

With a built-in GPS, IPX8 water resistance rating, optical heart rate monitor and 4GB of on-board storage, the M600 is quite the feature-packed device. It also comes with support for Polar’s wonderful Flow app, allowing you to track just about any activity you can think of – rowing, skiing, hiking and much more. You’ll also be able to squeeze about two days of battery life out of this thing, which is impressive for an Android Wear watch.

It’s very pricey, though, starting at $329. You can certainly find Android Wear devices for less than that, but the M600 provides much more than other devices. If you’re in the market for a smartwatch/fitness tracker hybrid and don’t mind spending upwards of $300, look no further.

Specs

  • 1.3-inch TFT display with 240 x 240 resolution, 260ppi
  • 1.2GHz dual-core MediaTek MT2601 processor
  • 512MB of RAM
  • 4GB of on-board storage
  • 500mAh battery
  • 45 x 36 x 13mm, 63g
  • IPX8 water resistance

Read more

Buy now from Amazon

Runner up

Moto 360 Sport

If you’re a fan of the second-generation Moto 360 but need something a bit more rugged, you should check out the Moto 360 Sport. It has basically the same internal specifications, plus GPS tracking capabilities. The battery on this device does suffer a bit with the GPS turned on, but that can easily be forgiven when taking into account the watch’s other great features. It has a killer AnyLight Hybrid display that makes it super easy to see outdoors, as well as an IP67 rating for dust and water resistance.

All in all, this is the go-to Android Wear option if you need something to track your exercises. As of right now it only supports run tracking, but Motorola says more exercises will be added to the watch in the future. The Moto 360 Sport starts at $199.99 from Motorola’s website, but you can usually find it much cheaper on Amazon.

Specs

  • 1.37-inch AnyLight Hybrid Display with 360 x 325 resolution, 263ppi
  • 1.2GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 processor
  • 512MB of RAM
  • 4GB of on-board storage
  • 300mAh battery
  • 45 x 45 x 11.5mm, 54g
  • IP67 dust and water resistance

Read more

Buy now from Amazon
Buy now from Motorola

There you have it, our list of the best Android Wear devices on the market. Did we miss something? Be sure to tell us what you think in the comments below!

Next:

The best smartwatches

November 10, 2016

With Android Wear critical, open source AsteroidOS offers smartwatches a life line

Android Wear has been on life support for a while. We’re still waiting for the miracle cure of Android Wear 2.0, but the clock is ticking, the doctors seem pre-occupied and various relatives have already given up hope as smartwatches limp ever closer to the precipice. But smartwatches may just have a new hope: a new open-source wearable platform called AsteroidOS.

See also:

Best smartwatches

November 10, 2016

AsteroidOS is the brainchild of French computer science student Florent Revest. It is not even based on Android Wear, but is a standalone Linux-based wearable OS that has been designed specifically to make it as portable as possible. AsteroidOS’ open-source nature also sidesteps the one great failing of Android Wear: it can be freely modified by developers and manufacturers.

With Android Wear critical, open source AsteroidOS offers smartwatches a life line

AsteroidOS is still in alpha phase and as such is far from perfect, but the demo video shared recently on YouTube demonstrates how solid it looks already, complete with several default apps like a calendar, alarm clock, timer, calculator, weather, stopwatch and music app. You can even already pair it with your Android phone via Bluetooth and receive notifications. Check it out in action below.

The immediate goals of Florent and the team of developers who have spent the last year developing AsteroidOS is to improve its battery life and add support for more sensors.

Jolla, the company behind SailfishOS, has already lent its support to the new wearable platform, indicating it might not be long before the OS gets even more support from larger partners (not to mention smaller devs) looking to breathe new life into smartwatches. Of course, whether AsteroidOS is enough to salvage wearables is anybody’s guess.

With Android Wear critical, open source AsteroidOS offers smartwatches a life line

If you’ve got an Android Wear watch gathering dust in a drawer somewhere and would like to give AsteroidOS a spin, you can already grab builds for the LG Watch Urbane, original LG G Watch, Sony Smartwatch 3 and Asus Zenwatch 2.

You can find flashing instructions on AsteroidOS’ community page and find all the relevant technical info on Florent’s Github page, but do be warned that only the original G Watch currently has support for Bluetooth pairing.

Do you think Android Wear 2.0 will reinvigorate smartwatches? Or are wearables dead in the water?

Deal: Moto 360 Sport smartwatch on sale for $103.99 (35% off)

If you’ve been thinking of getting your hands on the Moto 360 Sport, now is the time to do so. Amazon is offering the device for only $103.99, which is 35 percent off its normal retail price. But keep in mind that the offer only stands for the white version of the smartwatch. The black and the orange edition — officially called Flame – are more pricey and will set you back $174 and $129.97.

The Moto 360 Sport smartwatch was released last December with an initial price tag of $299.99. If you haven’t already figured it out by looking at its name, the device is aimed at recreational athletes as it offers an optical heart rate monitor, an AnyLight display for better outdoor visibility, IP67 certification for dust and water resistance, and GPS.

See also:

Moto puts smartwatch development on the back burner

7 days ago

The device has been on sale a few times over the last couple of months, but this is currently the best deal we were able to find. For comparison reasons, the Moto 360 Sport is listed for $199.99 on Motorola’s official website.

There is no info on how long the deal will last, so we advise you to move fast if you want to get it. Visit Amazon’s sales page by clicking the button below and place your order while you still can.

Get the Moto 360 Sport

Do you think this is a good deal? Are you considering buying the Moto 360 Sport?

Samsung Gear S3 heading to India January 2017?

Samsung’s new Gear S3 smartwatch went on sale in the US, UK, Canada and other markets recently though Samsung hasn’t officially commented on the possibility of a release in India. Now, a report from Sam Mobile suggests that its Indian launch could be set for January 2017.

Both the Gear S3 Classic and Gear S3 Frontier variants are said to be arriving in India, according to Sam Mobile’s unnamed source(s), however a price point wasn’t mentioned. In the US, both versions of the Samsung Gear S3 cost $349.

See also:

Samsung Pay on the Gear S3 currently not compatible with the Pixel smartphones

3 days ago

In our hands-on review Gear S3 review, we said that the Tizen-based smartwatch, which features LTE and NFC capabilities, looked like a good addition to Samsung’s Gear line of smartwatches and noted that the Gear S2 is still around for those who want a more accessible size and design.

We’ll look out for an official announcement from Samsung on this and let you know when we learn more. Are you likely to pick up a Gear S3? Let us know in the comments.

Deal: Save over $100 on a Samsung Gear S2 for just $159

The Samsung Gear S2 is easily among the best smartwatches available. It’s unique circular interface and bezel navigation make it stand out amongst its Android Wear-powered competition and while it has recently been superseded by the Samsung Gear S3, that means the Gear S 2 is now up to be discounted.

See also:

Samsung offering $10,000 to Tizen app developers

1 week ago

With a regular price tag of $299 and a current best price on Amazon of $233, this $159 deal via Buy Dig will save you a small fortune. Samsung is really pushing the Tizen platform too, offering up big bucks to developers making new apps for the platform and partnering up with Microsoft to expand Tizen.

The Gear S2 specs include the usual mix:  1.2-inch 360 x 360 Super AMOLED display, 1 GHz processor, 4 GB of storage and 512 MB of RAM. There’s a 250 mAh li-ion battery in there that should see you through the day and an IP68 rating so you can get and wild with your watch on.

You’ll also get a free 2,600 mAh keychain battery pack to charge up your mobile devices on the go. To take advantage of this deal, just hit the link below and push on through to the checkout to see the discounted price and claim your free gift.