Qualcomm Snapdragon 835

Qualcomm Snapdragon 835

Snapdragon 835 uses Google TensorFlow to run AI apps faster

Qualcomm revealed more info on its upcoming Snapdragon 835 mobile processor last week during CES 2017. However, its not done yet with reveals about its latest high-end chip. This week, it revealed that it will support Google’s TensorFlow machine learning framework for better app performance.

See also:

Qualcomm’s Kryo 280 and ‘Built on ARM Cortex Technology’ explained

1 week ago

Google already uses TensorFlow in some of its own Android apps, such as Google Photos and Google Cloud Speech. Qualcomm says it was designed to run on processing units inside of processors and of course the Snapdragon 835 has that kind of design, with its Kyro 280 CPU, the Adreno 540 GPU, and the Hexagon 682 DSP.

In the case of apps that use TensorFlow, the Snapdragon 835 will use the Hexagon 682 DSP, so that the apps don’t have to task the CPU. Google created two example apps, both of which can recognized real-world objects when placed in front of a smartphone camera. In this case, the app that used the TensorFlow framework and ran on the Hexagon DSP was able to recognize more objects at a faster rate than the same app that used the CPU to do the same tasks.

TensorFlow is also open source software and is available to use by any Android app creator. The Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor is scheduled to make its first appearance inside a smartphone sometime in early 2017.

Qualcomm’s Kryo 280 and ‘Built on ARM Cortex Technology’ explained

One of the most interesting revelations about Qualcomm’s new Snapdragon 835 mobile application processor is intriguing new semi-custom design Kryo 280 CPU core. Unlike last year’s fully custom Kryo core in the Snapdragon 820 and the off-the-shelve ARM Cortex-A72 and A53 found inside the Snapdragon 810, the Kryo 280 uses ARM’s latest Cortex licensing agreement. The Kryo 280 is also the first semi-custom ARM CPU design to make its way into a customer grade processor.

ARM unveiled the latest part of its Cortex licensing arrangement back in May 2016. This licensing range offers up a selection of options depending on what the vendor is looking for. This can range from early lead access to a new micro-architecture through to the latest “Built on ARM Cortex Technology” license, which is what Qualcomm has used to design the Kryo 280.

The Cortex License allows partners to customize existing Cortex-A, M, and R products with a selection of configuration options to adjust performance, power efficiency, and other characteristics. This is more of a set menu than a buffet though, as there are strict rules about what and how partners can design their custom Cortex chip. Although partners retain branding freedom around the CPU, hence why Qualcomm can keep using its Kryo despite using Cortex-A technology.

Qualcomm’s Kryo 280 and ‘Built on ARM Cortex Technology’ explained

 

By comparison, Qualcomm’s custom Kryo and Krait CPU designs in the past have made use of an Architecture License from ARM. This grants the designer much greater freedom to design their core however they like and it doesn’t have to make any reference to an existing Cortex design. The only condition is that the CPU must retain 100% compatible with ARM’s instruction set (in these cases ARMv8 and ARMv7), by passing the company’s architecture validation.

So what about the Kryo 280?

Unfortunately, Qualcomm is keeping tight lipped about the type of Cortex-A core that it has based it’s Kryo design on, as well as the exact changes that it has made to the core design. We suspect that Qualcomm has based Kryo 280 on ARM’s latest high performance Cortex-A73 design, especially as both the core and the chip boast about sustained peak performance over previous design. Although this is just a hunch.

The semi-custom licensing arrangement allows for designers like Qualcomm to request tweaks to certain aspects of the processor design, such as the instruction window size, increasing the size of resources in the pipeline, or adjusting the buffer of the branch predictor. For example, a larger out-of-order instruction window, which determines the number of instructions that can be executed out-of-order, would increase performance at the cost of more die space and power consumption. On the other hand, optimizing the branch predictor can be helpful for eking out the best performance based on the core’s other resources. Again though, there hasn’t been any official word on these exact details when it comes to the Snapdragon 835.

What’s particularly interesting about Kryo 280 is that Qualcomm appears to be using the same core for both it’s high performance and energy efficient clusters. This is unlike big.LITTLE designs which typically pair a low power Cortex-A53 along with a bigger A72 or A73.

Qualcomm’s Kryo 280 and ‘Built on ARM Cortex Technology’ explained

It appears that Qualcomm has made different tweaks to the same ARM Cortex CPU design for its Performance and Efficiency clusters. Making adjustments to some of the previously mentioned attributes should allow Qualcomm to make a number of space and efficiency savings above and beyond just lowering the clock frequency. This will help save power instead of using a smaller less capable core design, while retaining some of the performance benefits of a more powerful Cortex A design. Such a middle ground CPU design would fit in nicely with Qualcomm’s target to run 85 percent of processing time on the Snapdragon 835’s efficient cores.

Whatever Qualcomm has done, it’s important to note that other licensees aren’t privy to the tweaks that other developers make to their “Built on ARM Cortex Technology” SoCs. Even through the Kryo 280 is based on an ARM Cortex design and intellectual property, it will remain exclusive to Qualcomm’s processors.

See also:

Snapdragon 835 unveiled – Everything you need to know

17 hours ago

Wrap Up

The launch of the first “Built on ARM Cortex Technology” mobile application processor its a major milestone for both ARM and Qualcomm. For ARM, it’s not just another important licensing deal for a flagship processor, but vindication that it’s Cortex-A designs are still propelling the market forward and that the industry’s biggest processor manufacturer is finding use for its portfolio of development tools and options. After all, Qualcomm states that it assess and picks the best component options each generation, and this year the company has concluded that a custom ARM part is the best available technology for its Snapdragon 835 processor.

For Qualcomm, the Kryo 280 not only offers up some compelling performance and power efficiency improvements for consumers, but is also an important differentiator to separate its products from the increasingly competitive mobile SoC market. Marking use of ARM’s latest licensing option ensures that Qualcomm is staying at the top of the mobile processor market.

Why Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 is a big deal for mobile VR

Virtual reality entered the mainstream in 2016 and 2017 looks set to push the associated technologies into their next generation. Mobile is a promising avenue for virtual reality which is ripe for development, and Qualcomm’s latest Snapdragon 835 mobile application processor could end up being an important catalyst.

Qualcomm’s newly unveiled Snapdragon 835 is promising plenty of improvements for smartphones this year, but the company has also integrated lots of features into the chip that will help power the next generation of mobile virtual reality applications, and future augmented reality hardware too. While smartphone based projects like Daydream, which the Snapdragon 835 supports, are the primary focus for many manufacturers, Qualcomm’s Snapdragon is also designed to power standalone virtual reality headsets too. Here’s a look at exactly what the company has done to empower the next generation of portable virtual reality headsets.

See also:

Snapdragon 835 unveiled – Everything you need to know

4 hours ago

Extra processing grunt and new display features

Graphics processing power is essential for virtual reality applications, and Qualcomm has boosted the 3D performance of its Adreno 540 GPU by up to 25 percent over the Adreno 530 inside the Snapdragon 820. A needed boost for sure, and the Adreno 540 also supports a range of lower level graphics API, which will give developers better access to resources and help them boost performance.

The Adreno 540 boasts a 25% boost to 3D rendering perfromance over the 530, but also introduces support for 10-bit HDR displays and QSync refresh syncing, along with Vulkan, OpenGL ES 3.2, OpenCL 2.0, and DX12 API support.

Vulkan, OpenGL ES 3.2, full OpenCL 2.0, and Microsoft’s DirectX 12 are all supported this time around. Vulkan and DX12 are very important as they can greaty increase multi-core CPU utilization over OpenGL ES, which will be a boon for the Snapdragon 835. Qualcomm has moved back to an octa-core arrangement with its Krait 280 CPUs, from a quad-core arrangement with Snapdragon 820, which could provide a lot more CPU power above any beyond core architecture improvements.

On top of additional performance, improvements to the Snapdragon 835’s display (DPU) and video (VPU) processing units will offer up benefits for virtual reality applications. The introduction of Q-Sync into the VPU will lock compatible display refresh rates to the GPU frame rate, much like NVIDIA’s G-SYNC technology and AMD’s support of the FreeSync standard. Virtual reality framerates still need to remain high, but Q-Sync will be helpful at reducing motion sickness caused by stutter from dropped frames.

The DPU now also supports display resolution at 4K with a 60fps output. While the refresh rate is perhaps not quite as fast as we’d like for VR, we should see lower resolution displays supported with the required frame rate. The DPU also supports 10-bit HDR content, allowing for better looking virtual reality content with a higher contrast ratio. Immersion is the key after all.

See also:

Augmented Reality – Everything you need to know

July 20, 2016

Enhanced audio and sensors

It’s not just graphical horsepower that’s important for bringing immersive VR to the mobile space, accurate sensors and binaural audio technologies are just as important.

With the Snapdragon 835, Qualcomm has introduced support for six unique measurements axes. This augments existing X, Y, and Z rotational tracking with height and directional movement tracking as well, which will allow users to move through virtual spaces without the need for external tracking equipment. Qualcomm has accomplished this by supporting improved 800 and 1000Hz sensor sampling speeds for accelerometer and gyroscope data respectively. This can be combined with imaging data from a monocular camera on a headset to support position and orientation data. Qualcomm also boasts that this computation can be carried out entirely on the Snapdragon 835’s Hexagon DSP with just a 15ms motion to photon latency, leaving the CPU and GPU free to render a scene for the wearer.

Why Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 is a big deal for mobile VR

On the audio side, there’s new support for object and scene based placement in a 3D space. Part of Qualcomm’s SDK can assist designers to build 3D audio for virtual reality environments. The 835 also includes support for HRTE binaural audio processing, which is used to emulate the characteristics of the human ear for realistic sound placement. Again, this can be calculated on the DSP with minimal input from the CPU in order to speed up processing and save on battery life.

Machine learning and smart processing

As you can see, Qualcomm’s efforts to improve mobile virtual reality are quite heavily reliant on the smart use of the various different processors tucked into the Snapdragon 835. Heterogeneous compute is part of the solution, but the company is also looking to machine learning algorithms to improve performance and bring new features to the platform too.

One such example is the use of eye tracking technologies to assist with foveated rendering. Foveated rendering is a technique used to reduce GPU load in virtual reality rendering by decreasing the rendering resolution at the edges of the screen, there the wearer doesn’t tend to observe. However, this can break immersion if the user’s looks off to the side of the screen. Integrating eye tracking cameras in the headset and using machine learning algorithms on the 835’s DSP can track the wearer’s eye movement with minimal latency and processing overhead. This can then be used in conjunction with GPU foveated rendering techniques to reduce the image quality and therefore GPU load on parts of the screen that the user currently isn’t looking at.

Why Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 is a big deal for mobile VR

Alternatively, iris screening technologies and machine learning algorithms can be used to assist with setting up a virtual reality headset for a user to wear. Each person has a unique inter-pupillary distance and this affects the focus of the VR image as it comes through the lenses. Usually, some setup time is required and adjustments made to the headset to accommodate each wearer. However, machine learning tools and iris tracking could be used to automatically calibrate rendered objects, such as an augmented or virtual reality HUD, so that they are in focus.

As a final example, the Snapdragon 835 supports gesture recognition from a camera input, which can be used to interact with objects and games in virtual reality, rather than having to rely on physical controllers. Once more, images can be analysed using machine learning tools on the Hexagon DSP, rather the CPU or GPU, in order to lighten the load on these components and produce faster, more accurate results.

Related:

Google Daydream View review

November 10, 2016

We mustn’t forget that the Snapdragon 835 is designed to be Qualcomm’s most power efficient flagship mobile SoC to date. The new high efficiency Krait 280 CPU cores and move to 10nm FinFET process node, combined with intelligent use other processing cores, can see power users gain 2.5 hours of battery life over the 820. This means that phones and standalone headsets should be able to run VR apps and games for longer and will also presumable produce less heat too, which are notable gains for mobile VR.

Assisting developers

Eking out every drop of performance is going to be vital to obtaining suitable virtual reality performance in mobile products, and Qualcomm is now giving the developers the tools to get closer to the metal. The Symphony System Manager that debuted with the Snapdragon 820 VR platform extends to the Snapdragon 835 and allows software developers to assign tasks to specific CPU cores, the GPU, and even the DSP, meaning the possibility of a higher level of optimization for VR apps. Qualcomm has also revealed that the low level Vulkan API can be run on just a single little core of its Snapdragon 835, leaving plenty of spare resources for developers to work with.

The Snapdragon 835 supports gesture recognition from a camera input, which can be used to interact with objects and games in virtual reality instead of using a controller.

On top of better utilization of its core components, Qualcomm is assisting virtual reality software developers through its Snapdragon VR SDK. The SDK can assist developers with tasks ranging from utilizing the Snapdragon 820 and 835’s sensors and DSP, through to stereoscopic rendering.

For hardware developers, a Snapdragon VR 835 reference platform provides a starting point for engineers and manufacturers to design their own standalone VR headset powered by Qualcomm’s latest flagship. The Snapdragon 835 also supports Google’s Daydream platform, meaning that Snapdragon 835 products will work with Google’s virtual reality hardware as well.

Wrap Up

Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 builds on the heterogeneous compute, machine learning, and virtual reality features that made their debut with the Snapdragon 820 last year. The end result is a SoC that caters well to the growing demands of mobile virtual and augmented reality. While very high performance hardware will remain limited to the desktop PC space, Qualcomm’s efforts with the 835 looks capable of enabling VR developers to offer compelling experiences in a much more constrained power and thermal budget.

See also:

Next-gen Gear VR may feature eye and face tracking

November 30, 2016

While the Snapdragon 835 is still designed very much with smartphones in mind, Qualcomm is also making a bold push into the mobile virtual and augmented reality markets with its new flagship SoC. I’m sure we will see plenty of VR hardware and content powered by the platform over the coming months and years.

This article originally appeared on VRSource.com

Why Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 is a big deal for mobile VR

Virtual reality entered the mainstream in 2016 and 2017 looks set to push the associated technologies into their next generation. Mobile is a promising avenue for virtual reality which is ripe for development, and Qualcomm’s latest Snapdragon 835 mobile application processor could end up being an important catalyst.

Qualcomm’s newly unveiled Snapdragon 835 is promising plenty of improvements for smartphones this year, but the company has also integrated lots of features into the chip that will help power the next generation of mobile virtual reality applications, and future augmented reality hardware too. While smartphone based projects like Daydream, which the Snapdragon 835 supports, are the primary focus for many manufacturers, Qualcomm’s Snapdragon is also designed to power standalone virtual reality headsets too. Here’s a look at exactly what the company has done to empower the next generation of portable virtual reality headsets.

See also:

Snapdragon 835 unveiled – Everything you need to know

4 hours ago

Extra processing grunt and new display features

Graphics processing power is essential for virtual reality applications, and Qualcomm has boosted the 3D performance of its Adreno 540 GPU by up to 25 percent over the Adreno 530 inside the Snapdragon 820. A needed boost for sure, and the Adreno 540 also supports a range of lower level graphics API, which will give developers better access to resources and help them boost performance.

The Adreno 540 boasts a 25% boost to 3D rendering perfromance over the 530, but also introduces support for 10-bit HDR displays and QSync refresh syncing, along with Vulkan, OpenGL ES 3.2, OpenCL 2.0, and DX12 API support.

Vulkan, OpenGL ES 3.2, full OpenCL 2.0, and Microsoft’s DirectX 12 are all supported this time around. Vulkan and DX12 are very important as they can greaty increase multi-core CPU utilization over OpenGL ES, which will be a boon for the Snapdragon 835. Qualcomm has moved back to an octa-core arrangement with its Krait 280 CPUs, from a quad-core arrangement with Snapdragon 820, which could provide a lot more CPU power above any beyond core architecture improvements.

On top of additional performance, improvements to the Snapdragon 835’s display (DPU) and video (VPU) processing units will offer up benefits for virtual reality applications. The introduction of Q-Sync into the VPU will lock compatible display refresh rates to the GPU frame rate, much like NVIDIA’s G-SYNC technology and AMD’s support of the FreeSync standard. Virtual reality framerates still need to remain high, but Q-Sync will be helpful at reducing motion sickness caused by stutter from dropped frames.

The DPU now also supports display resolution at 4K with a 60fps output. While the refresh rate is perhaps not quite as fast as we’d like for VR, we should see lower resolution displays supported with the required frame rate. The DPU also supports 10-bit HDR content, allowing for better looking virtual reality content with a higher contrast ratio. Immersion is the key after all.

See also:

Augmented Reality – Everything you need to know

July 20, 2016

Enhanced audio and sensors

It’s not just graphical horsepower that’s important for bringing immersive VR to the mobile space, accurate sensors and binaural audio technologies are just as important.

With the Snapdragon 835, Qualcomm has introduced support for six unique measurements axes. This augments existing X, Y, and Z rotational tracking with height and directional movement tracking as well, which will allow users to move through virtual spaces without the need for external tracking equipment. Qualcomm has accomplished this by supporting improved 800 and 1000Hz sensor sampling speeds for accelerometer and gyroscope data respectively. This can be combined with imaging data from a monocular camera on a headset to support position and orientation data. Qualcomm also boasts that this computation can be carried out entirely on the Snapdragon 835’s Hexagon DSP with just a 15ms motion to photon latency, leaving the CPU and GPU free to render a scene for the wearer.

Why Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 is a big deal for mobile VR

On the audio side, there’s new support for object and scene based placement in a 3D space. Part of Qualcomm’s SDK can assist designers to build 3D audio for virtual reality environments. The 835 also includes support for HRTE binaural audio processing, which is used to emulate the characteristics of the human ear for realistic sound placement. Again, this can be calculated on the DSP with minimal input from the CPU in order to speed up processing and save on battery life.

Machine learning and smart processing

As you can see, Qualcomm’s efforts to improve mobile virtual reality are quite heavily reliant on the smart use of the various different processors tucked into the Snapdragon 835. Heterogeneous compute is part of the solution, but the company is also looking to machine learning algorithms to improve performance and bring new features to the platform too.

One such example is the use of eye tracking technologies to assist with foveated rendering. Foveated rendering is a technique used to reduce GPU load in virtual reality rendering by decreasing the rendering resolution at the edges of the screen, there the wearer doesn’t tend to observe. However, this can break immersion if the user’s looks off to the side of the screen. Integrating eye tracking cameras in the headset and using machine learning algorithms on the 835’s DSP can track the wearer’s eye movement with minimal latency and processing overhead. This can then be used in conjunction with GPU foveated rendering techniques to reduce the image quality and therefore GPU load on parts of the screen that the user currently isn’t looking at.

Why Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 is a big deal for mobile VR

Alternatively, iris screening technologies and machine learning algorithms can be used to assist with setting up a virtual reality headset for a user to wear. Each person has a unique inter-pupillary distance and this affects the focus of the VR image as it comes through the lenses. Usually, some setup time is required and adjustments made to the headset to accommodate each wearer. However, machine learning tools and iris tracking could be used to automatically calibrate rendered objects, such as an augmented or virtual reality HUD, so that they are in focus.

As a final example, the Snapdragon 835 supports gesture recognition from a camera input, which can be used to interact with objects and games in virtual reality, rather than having to rely on physical controllers. Once more, images can be analysed using machine learning tools on the Hexagon DSP, rather the CPU or GPU, in order to lighten the load on these components and produce faster, more accurate results.

Related:

Google Daydream View review

November 10, 2016

We mustn’t forget that the Snapdragon 835 is designed to be Qualcomm’s most power efficient flagship mobile SoC to date. The new high efficiency Krait 280 CPU cores and move to 10nm FinFET process node, combined with intelligent use other processing cores, can see power users gain 2.5 hours of battery life over the 820. This means that phones and standalone headsets should be able to run VR apps and games for longer and will also presumable produce less heat too, which are notable gains for mobile VR.

Assisting developers

Eking out every drop of performance is going to be vital to obtaining suitable virtual reality performance in mobile products, and Qualcomm is now giving the developers the tools to get closer to the metal. The Symphony System Manager that debuted with the Snapdragon 820 VR platform extends to the Snapdragon 835 and allows software developers to assign tasks to specific CPU cores, the GPU, and even the DSP, meaning the possibility of a higher level of optimization for VR apps. Qualcomm has also revealed that the low level Vulkan API can be run on just a single little core of its Snapdragon 835, leaving plenty of spare resources for developers to work with.

The Snapdragon 835 supports gesture recognition from a camera input, which can be used to interact with objects and games in virtual reality instead of using a controller.

On top of better utilization of its core components, Qualcomm is assisting virtual reality software developers through its Snapdragon VR SDK. The SDK can assist developers with tasks ranging from utilizing the Snapdragon 820 and 835’s sensors and DSP, through to stereoscopic rendering.

For hardware developers, a Snapdragon VR 835 reference platform provides a starting point for engineers and manufacturers to design their own standalone VR headset powered by Qualcomm’s latest flagship. The Snapdragon 835 also supports Google’s Daydream platform, meaning that Snapdragon 835 products will work with Google’s virtual reality hardware as well.

Wrap Up

Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 builds on the heterogeneous compute, machine learning, and virtual reality features that made their debut with the Snapdragon 820 last year. The end result is a SoC that caters well to the growing demands of mobile virtual and augmented reality. While very high performance hardware will remain limited to the desktop PC space, Qualcomm’s efforts with the 835 looks capable of enabling VR developers to offer compelling experiences in a much more constrained power and thermal budget.

See also:

Next-gen Gear VR may feature eye and face tracking

November 30, 2016

While the Snapdragon 835 is still designed very much with smartphones in mind, Qualcomm is also making a bold push into the mobile virtual and augmented reality markets with its new flagship SoC. I’m sure we will see plenty of VR hardware and content powered by the platform over the coming months and years.

This article originally appeared on VRSource.com

More info reportedly leaks on Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 before CES 2017

Ahead of its press event this week at the 2017 Consumer Electronic Show, more info has apparently leaked about the upcoming Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor.

See also:

Beyond phones: Why Qualcomm is betting big on machine learning, VR and 5G

November 24, 2016

The info comes from noted gadget leaker Evan “@evleaks” Blass, who apparently got a hold of an internal Qualcomm press release on the Snapdragon 835. Some of the features center on graphics. The press release says the new chip will have 25 percent faster 3D graphic rendering compared to the older Snapdragon 820, along 60 times more display colors. The Snapdragon 835 will also have 20 percent less motion-to-photon latency.

Smartphone cameras will also get some zoom and stabilization improvements with the new chip, along with better and faster auto-focus. The Snapdragon 835 was made on a new 10nm design, and it will be 30 percent smaller than the Snapdragon 820. This should allow smartphones to be thinner while still adding larger batteries. The chip will also use 40 percent less power while still getting a 27 percent performance increase. Qualcomm has already announced that the chip will support Quick Charge 4, which should be capable of adding five hours of battery life with just 5 minutes of charging time.

While Qualcomm has yet to announce which phones will get the Snapdragon 835 processor, ASUS has already hinted it will reveal a phone with the new chip at CES this week.

Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 will ‘come into focus’ at CES 2017

Qualcomm looks like it will reveal more info on its upcoming Snapdragon 835 processor next week at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. A newly posted teaser claims that the 835 will “come into focus” at the event.

See also:

Beyond phones: Why Qualcomm is betting big on machine learning, VR and 5G

November 24, 2016

The company previously revealed that the Snapdragon 835 would be made with Samsung’s 10-nanometer FinFET process. It will also support the company’s Quick Charge 4 technology, which is designed to charge the battery of a smartphone with five hours of life with just five minutes of charging time.

So far, Qualcomm has not revealed much in the way of hardware specifics for the Snapdragon 835, such as clock speed and graphics performance. A recent benchmarking result on the GFXBench site for an alleged 835 development board claims the chip has an octa-core design with a clock speed of 2.2GHz and that its Adreno 540 GPU is 30 percent faster than the current Adreno 530 chip. However, online benchmarking results can be faked, and a development board’s results might also differ from the final product.

Unconfirmed rumors claim the first phone with the 835 will be none other than the Samsung Galaxy S8, which may be revealed sometime in April.

Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 could get a big graphics boost over 821

0

Qualcomm announced the Snapdragon 835 mobile processor a few weeks ago, but so far the company hasn’t offered any official info on its clock speed or graphics performance. However, new online benchmarking results may have provided some early information on those details.

See also:

Qualcomm Snapdragon 821 versus Apple A10 Fusion

5 days ago

The GFXBench site has recorded what appears to be the development board for the Snapdragon 835. Its numbers show that it has an octa-core design with a clock speed of 2.2GHz. However, the numbers for the processor’s Adreno 540 GPU may be more impressive. The benchmark indicates 30 percent better performance compared to the Adreno 530 that’s part of the current Snapdragon 821 processor.

Keep in mind that these numbers come from an online benchmarking site and, as a result, they may not be completely trustworthy. Also, the stats come from an early development board for the Snapdragon 835, so the final production board could see some performance improvements and final clock speeds could always change.

The Snapdragon 835 processor is expected to start showing up inside select smartphones sometime in early 2017. Unconfirmed rumors claim the first phone with the 835 will be none other than the Samsung Galaxy S8, which could be revealed in late February as part of the Mobile Word Congress 2017 trade show.

Snapdragon 835 tipped for the Galaxy S8, but what about Exynos?

As part of yesterday’s leaked details about the upcoming Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 (MSM8998) chip set, eagle eyed readers may have spotted reference to the Samsung Galaxy S8 at the bottom of the chart. According to the spec sheet, the Samsung Galaxy S8 will be the first smartphone powered by the octa-core Snapdragon 835 and the phone will make its debut around MWC 2017, which many were already expecting.

This year’s Samsung Galaxy S7 sports Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 820 flagship SoC, but also came with an Exynos 8890 variant in some regions. Samsung has been quiet about its next generation mobile SoC, but a number of reports and rumors suggest that an Exynos 8895 or 9 series chip is under development, and could again likely end up powering some Galaxy S8 models.

Samsung's next-gen Exynos chip may offer additional ISP and modem features to better compete with Qualcomm's Snapdragon

For a recap, the Snapdragon 835 leak suggests that we’re looking at an octa-core Kryo 200 CPU setup, a new Adreno 540 GPU, LPDDR4X RAM and UFS 2.1 memory, along with a X16 modem, all packaged using Samsung’s 10nm FinFET manufacturing technology. If the move back to an octa-core configuration turns out to be true, the 835 may end up looking a little more similar to Samsung’s Exynos chip again, which is likely to be sticking with a big.LITTLE CPU configuration.

Although details about both the chips remain unconfirmed, previous rumors about the Exynos 8895 processor point to a higher clocked version of the 8890, potentially reaching 3GHz for the big cores and 2.7GHz for the little cores. Although it’s not clear if Samsung plans to stick with its M1 CPU core, revise it, or return to an ARM Cortex solution next generation. However, it’s almost certain that Samsung will build such a chip on its own 10nm FinFET process. The chip is also expected to feature ARM’s latest Mali-G71 GPU, which can offer up to 80% more performance than the Mali-T880 found in this year’s Exynos 8890, and supports 4K content and displays. The Mali-G71 has already made its debut inside HiSilicon’s Kirin 960.

Samsung’s next generation processor, which will probably appear as a 9XXX series chip rather than the 8895, is also tipped to offer up a 70 percent boost to its image processing capabilities, which may be useful for a dual camera configuration. More recently there has also been talk about integrating a Shannon modem often used by the company into the SoCs itself, something which Qualcomm already does with its in-house X series modems.

Snapdragon 835 tipped for the Galaxy S8, but what about Exynos?

ARM’s Mali-G71 GPU, rumored for the next-gen Exynos, would be key for driving high resolution displays needed for VR.

Samsung is apparently interested in the Shannon 359 modem, which incorporates LD-LTE, LTE FDD, TD-SDCMA, WCDMA, CDMA, and GSM capabilities into a single chip. This would essentially allow Samsung to cover all of the world’s networks with a single solution, rather than having to rely on Qualcomm for CDMA coverage in countries like the USA. However, the Shannon 359 isn’t expected to arrive until Q3 2017, so this technology won’t be available in time for the Galaxy S8 and Samsung’s next Exynos SoC.

See also:

Samsung Galaxy S8: all the rumors in one place

4 weeks ago

With Samsung’s semiconductor division playing an increasingly important role in terms of company profitability, Samsung will be unlikely to turn down the opportunity to power at least some of its Galaxy S8 handsets with an in-house Exynos processor. Providing that it competes with the Snapdragon 835 on features and performance.

Alleged Snapdragon 835 and Snapdragon 660 specs leak

An image obtained by Chinese tech site anzhuo.cn might have revealed the specs for Qualcomm’s next-generation mobile processor, the Snapdragon 835. Qualcomm announced the Snapdragon 835 – previously thought to be called the Snapdragon 830 – last week, but didn’t delve into details concerning its hardware. Now the finer details may be out in the open.

The image, which also references a Snapdragon 660, was reposted by Gizmochina and suggests that the Snapdragon 835 will be based on a revised Kryo 200 CPU architecture, featuring an octa-core design with four large and four small cores (clock speeds unknown), an Adreno 540 GPU and the company’s X16 LTE modem. For comparison, this year’s flagship 14nm Snapdragon 820 features a quad-core Kryo CPU, Adreno 530 GPU, and X12 LTE modem.

Alleged Snapdragon 835 and Snapdragon 660 specs leak

The Snapdragon 835 will provide peak LTE download speeds of up to 1 Gbps, and four-channel LPDDR4X-1866 RAM, in addition to UFS2.1 flash memory.

Meanwhile, the Snapdragon 660 processor appears to be built up Samsung’s 14nm FinFet LPP manufacturing process, with four 2.2 GHz cores and four 1.9 GHz cores. The chip would also employ an Adreno 512 GPU, X10 baseband, and two channel LPDDR4X-1866 memory and UFS 2.1 flash memory. The Snapdragon 660 looks set to be the successor to the mid-range octa-core Snapdragon 652.

See also:

Qualcomm announces Snapdragon 835, built on Samsung’s 10nm process

5 days ago

During its unveiling last week, Qualcomm confirmed that the Snapdragon 835 would feature Samsung’s 10-nanometer FinFET process – an industry first – and said that its Quick-Charge 4.0 technology could provide five hours of battery life in a five-minute charge. Smartphones carrying the new chipset are expected to launch in the first half of 2017.

Thanks for the tip XaErO!

Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 4 will offer 5 hours of battery life in just 5 minutes

Along with today’s official announcement of the Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor, the company is also introducing Quick Charge 4. The new version of its fast-charging battery technology will be used first with smartphones that have the Snapdragon 835 chip inside. Qualcomm claims it will allow owners to get 5 hours of battery life with just 5 minutes of charging.

See also:

Qualcomm Quick Charge vs Oppo VOOC vs MediaTek PumpExpress+ vs Motorola TurboPower vs the others (updated)

February 4, 2016

In its presentation slides, Qualcomm stated that the first three versions of Quick Charge have helped it to become the number one mobile fast charging method in the industry.

Over 100 mobile devices from companies like Samsung, LG, Lenovo, ZTE and even Google have used versions of Quick Charge, and there are over 300 accessory products like wall and car adapters, battery packs and docking stations that also support the technology.

Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 4 will offer 5 hours of battery life in just 5 minutes

For the new Quick Charge 4 (yes, Quick Charge 4, not 4.0), Qualcomm says that it charges smartphone batteries up to 20 percent faster compared to Quick Charge 3.0. At the same time, the new version is up to 5 degrees (Celsius) cooler while also offering up to 30 percent more efficient battery life.

Quick Charge 4 charges smartphone batteries up to 20 percent faster with 30 more efficient battery life.

Quick Charge 4 supports both USB Type-C and USB-PD connections and Qualcomm says it also supports USB Power Delivery with a 3A cable and a 5A specification needed for that support.

Quick Charge 4 also uses the third version of INOV (Intelligent Negotiation for Optimum Voltage). This new iteration of the company’s power-management algorithm includes real-time thermal management. Qualcomm called this “a technology industry first” and claims it offers “advance charging optimization by automatically determining and selecting the optimal power transfer level for a given thermal condition.”

There will also be a new standalone charger, with 6A of current, that still operates at 95 percent efficiency at 3A. Qualcomm says their Quick Charge 4 standard will offer intelligent thermal balancing, with high current charging handled on the companion chip.

Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 4 will offer 5 hours of battery life in just 5 minutes
In the wake of the concerns about exploding smartphone batteries that caused the recall and discontinuation of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 this year, Qualcomm made an effort to promote the many safety features and improvements it is putting into devices that will support Quick Charge 4.

In the wake of the Note 7 recall, Qualcomm made an effort to promote the many safety features and improvements in Quick Charge 4.

Both the smartphone and its power adapter will feature protections against higher temperatures, currents and voltage. Qualcomm added that it is adding an extra layer of protection “to help prevent battery over-charging and regulate current throughout every charge cycle”.  Sensors and monitors will be put in the chip, battery and PMIC for keeping things cool.

Quick Charge 4 products can also be made to be backwards compatible with Quick Charge 2.0 and 3.0 devices on a case by case basis. Qualcomm says that the first Snapdragon 835 processors with Quick Charge 4 support will start appearing in products that ship sometime in the first half of 2017.

Are you more excited for Quick Charge 4 or the Snapdragon 835?